Closet Challenge : Nine Month Review / Accepting Reality

This isn’t anywhere near so terrible as it sounds. Promise. A big something I’ve learned in this process is that the things we purchase tend to create a facade of who and what we’re trying to be, and don’t necessarily represent who and what we are. In beginning this challenge I thought I wanted to narrow things down to what’s really “me” and remove the things that aren’t. What I’ve discovered along the way is that my search is for authenticity. I want the things I own, purchase, and pursue to be things that accurately represent me. Aspirational purchases (those jeans I *might* fit into if I lost a few pounds) and impulse purchases are not for me. Neither are the expensive brand of yoga pants, or hanging on to a gift that just isn’t my style. I’ve given up fast food and haven’t looked back. So long cardigans! I’m building a wardrobe and a life that feels most authentic.

Looking back I wonder what took me so long to make the leap to a minimalist mindset. Deciding to downsize was a liberating moment and came with a realization – I was keeping all these things and clinging to the idea of them out of fear. What if I pulled away this facade? What would be left? What was my personal brand? When I pulled the facade away I found relief and a sense of freedom. All those things that aren’t in line with my personal brand were weighing me down, dragging behind me like an anchor, and taking up so much space. It was liberating to say goodbye to all those things represented a lifestyle I didn’t want to live.

Admittedly, it was a challenge in the beginning and I had to overcome some crazy thoughts. What it all comes down to is recognizing that it’s ok to not want what someone else wants. There’s no need to hang on to something just because it’s trendy, or someone famous has one like it, or it costs a lot of money. What works for you is all that matters here. That being said, it’s ok to change your mind about what you want. Minimizing a wardrobe doesn’t mean being stuck with the same, fewer, options forever. Over time weeding items out and adding new things in keeps the contents fresh. Also, it’s important to remember that these things are what define us, and as such they shouldn’t be aspirational. The items we own should complement who and what we are, add value to our lives, and be purposeful. Lastly, removing those things that aren’t a great fit isn’t a time for regret. It’s not a waste that these items were purchased in the first place or kept for a period of time. It’s happened, we’re making a change, if nothing else they’ve allowed us an opportunity to inch closer toward authenticity.

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